History

The Royal Canadian Regiment

Prepared by: Capt Michael O'Leary, CD (2011, updated 2013)

The Royal Canadian Regiment (The RCR) was authorized as a unit of Canada’s Permanent Force, now known as the Regular Force, on 21 December 1883. Created for the purpose of instructing the Canadian Militia, the Regiment was originally known as the Infantry School Corps. The Regiment’s first garrisons, each occupied by a company plus the supported Instructional Cadre, were at Fredericton, St Jean (PQ) and Toronto. A fourth Company was established in London, Ontario, in 1888.

Shortly after its formation, “C” Company of the Regiment saw action in the North-West Rebellion of 1885. In 1898, the Regiment provided men to the Yukon Field Force, which assisted with the policing of the Yukon Territory during the gold rush.

During the 1890s, the Regiment saw three changes to its title:

  • May 1892 – “Canadian Regiment of Infantry”
  • May 1893 – “The Royal Regiment of Canadian Infantry”
  • April 1899 - “The Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry”

The Royal Canadian Regiment formed Canada’s first contingent to the South African War when, in 1899, a 2nd (Special Service) Battalion was formed for service in South Africa during 1899-1900. A 3rd (Special Service) Battalion was also formed to provide the Halifax garrison between 1900 and 1902. Both of these units were comprised primarily of Militia soldiers who volunteered to serve in The RCR for the purpose of the operational deployment or garrison task.

In November 1901, the Regiment changed its name one more time, becoming “The Royal Canadian Regiment.”

At the outbreak of the First World War, The RCR was assembled at Halifax where Regimental Headquarters and six of the Regiment’s ten companies had been located since 1905, having replaced the last British Army garrison in Canada. The RCR was brought up to wartime strength in late 1914 as it started its first task which was to serve for a year as the garrison battalion in Bermuda until August 1915. The RCR then proceeded to England and onward to France as a battalion of the 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade in the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division.

The RCR was awarded 16 battle honours for its actions during the First World War, including the Somme 1916, Vimy Ridge and the Pursuit to Mons. One member of The RCR, Lieutenant Milton Fowler Gregg, was awarded the Victoria Cross.

In 1919, the Regiment received a singular honour when King George V granted the Regiment the right to wear Queen Victoria’s cypher – “VRI” – on its buttons and badges in perpetuity in recognition of its service in the First World War. This made the RCR the only Commonwealth regiment to wear a deceased sovereign’s cypher with no requirement to change cyphers following the coronation of a new King or Queen.

The RCR sailed for England shortly after the start of the Second World War where it trained for three years as a battalion of the 1st Canadian Infantry Brigade of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. The Regiment entered combat when it landed on the beaches of Sicily on 10 July 1943 – a date still commemorated within the Regiment as “Pachino Day.” The RCR fought their way through Sicily and Italy over almost 18 months including participation in the battles at Ortona, the Hitler Line at Pontecorvo and the Gothic Line on the Adriatic coast.

In February, 1945, The RCR joined the final push to liberate Northwest Europe, fighting their last battle at Apeldoorn, Holland. In the closing days of the war, a second battalion of the Regiment was created in Canada, its planned employment being in the Pacific Force. With the capitulation of Japan, this requirement disappeared and, following the return and disbandment of the overseas battalion, the newly created 2nd Battalion became the single battalion of The Royal Canadian Regiment in the post-war Canadian Army.

On the outbreak of the Korean War, The RCR still consisted of a single Regular Force battalion. During the three years of the war, two new battalions would be formed for the Special Force which fought in Korea, and all three battalions would serve in Korea in turn. The 2nd Battalion deployed in 1951, the 1st Battalion in 1952 and the 3rd Battalion in 1953. Following the Korean War, the 3rd Battalion was disbanded and the 2nd Battalion remained a unit of the Regular Force.

In July 1954, The Royal Canadian Regiment gained a Reserve Force battalion, formed by the amalgamation of The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun) and The Oxford Rifles. This new unit was designated the London and Oxford Fusiliers (3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment).

The Oxford Rifles

The Oxford Rifles originated in Woodstock, Ontario, on 14 August 1863, when the '"Twenty-second Battalion Volunteer Militia Rifles, Canada" or "The Oxford Rifles"' was authorized. In its early years, the unit was called out for service on the St Clair frontier during the Fenian Raids in 1866. The unit also provided some soldiers to the Canadian Contingents for South Africa.

From 1920 until 1936, the unit briefly had a two-battalion structure, with one battalion part of the Non-Permanent Active Militia and the second battalion on the Reserve establishment (i.e, without personnel). During the Second World War, the 1st Battalion, The Oxford Rifles, CASF, was mobilized for active service in March 1942. It served in Canada in a home defence role until January 1945 when it embarked for Britain where it was disbanded in England later that month.

Having undergone several changes in naming, the regiment was redesignated The Oxford Rifles on 1 June 1945. On 1 October 1954, it was amalgamated with 'The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun) and redesignated 'The London and Oxford Fusiliers (3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment)'.

The Oxford Rifles perpetuated the 71st and 168th Canadian Infantry Battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and carried the honours, awards and accomplishments of those units into the regimental history of The RCR.

The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun)

The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun) originated in London, Ontario on 27 April 1866 as the 7th Battalion Infantry, "Prince Arthur's Own". During the regiment’s early years, two companies were called out on active service in April 1870 during the Fenian Raids, serving on the St. Clair frontier. The unit also mobilized in 1885, serving in the Alberta column of the North West Field Force and provided troops to the Canadian Contingents in the South African War.

Undergoing several changes of name, including a brief period as a three-battalion regiment titled the Western Ontario Regiment during the early 1920s, the unit was designated The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) on 1 August 1924.21 On 15 December 1936 it was amalgamated with the 'Headquarters' and 'A Company' of the 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC, and redesignated The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun). During the Second World War, the regiment formed a second battalion; the 1st Battalion served as part of the Canadian Active Service Force (CASF) and the 2nd Battalion remained in the Reserve establishment.

The 1st Battalion, The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), CASF, was mobilized in 1942 and served on home defence duties as part of Pacific Command, taking part in the August 1943 expedition to Kiska, Alaska, with the 13th Canadian Infantry Brigade Group. The unit arrived in Britain in May 1944 where it was redesignated the 2nd Canadian Infantry Training Battalion, Type A (Canadian Fusiliers), CASF, and remained so until being disbanded in August 1945.

Following the Second World War, the Reserve battalion of the Canadian Fusiliers regained its single-battalion designation: The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun). On 1 October 1954, it was amalgamated with 'The Oxford Rifles.

The Canadian Fusiliers perpetuated the 1st, 33rd and 142nd Canadian Infantry Battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and carried the honours, awards and accomplishments of those units into the regimental history of The RCR.

2nd Machine Gun Battalion, Canadian Machine Gun Corps (CMGC)

The 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC, of the Canadian Militia originated when the 2nd Machine Gun Brigade, CMGC was authorized on 1 June 1919. The battalion was disbanded on 14 December 1936 with its HQ and companies amalgamating with a number of Militia units.

The 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC, of the Canadian Militia perpetuated the 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC, of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and carried the honours, awards and accomplishments of this unit into the regimental history of The RCR.

CEF Perpetuations

Through the amalgamations with The Canadian Fusiliers and The Oxford Rifles, the following units of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (1914-1919) are perpetuated by The Royal Canadian Regiment:

  • 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion, which fought in France and Flanders as part of the 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division until the end of the war.
  • 33rd Canadian Infantry Battalion, which provided reinforcements to the CEF and was later absorbed by the 36th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF.
  • 71st Canadian Infantry Battalion, which provided reinforcements to the CEF and was later absorbed by the 44th, 54th and 74th "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF.
  • 142nd Canadian Infantry Battalion, which provided reinforcements to the CEF and was later absorbed by the 23rd Reserve Battalion, CEF.
  • 168th Canadian Infantry Battalion, which provided reinforcements to the CEF and was later absorbed by the 4th Reserve Battalion, CEF, and the 6th Reserve Battalion, CEF.
  • 2nd Battalion, CMGC, CEF, which was organized in France in March 1918 from the 4th, 5th, 6th and 14th Canadian Machine Gun Companies. It provided machine gun support to the 2nd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war. Disbanded on 15 November 1920.
In 1958, formal amalgamation with The Royal Canadian Regiment was completed and the Reserve battalion was redesignated the 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment (London and Oxford Fusiliers). In 1959, the Regimental Executive Committee of The RCR confirmed the receipt of formal authority from the Army by which the Regiment would carry all of the perpetuations of the amalgamated regiments; to include the “1st, 33rd, 71st, 142nd and 168th CEF Battalions and 2nd M.G. Bn. CEF"

One of the most significant effects these perpetuations had on The RCR was to increase the list of battle honours carried by the Regiment for the First World War. The combined awards of First World War battle honours for The Royal Canadian Regiment, the 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion and the 2nd Battalion, CMGC, represent 49 separate unit battlefield actions and are represented by the 25 battle honour names carried today by The RCR for the Great War. (Additionally, The Oxford Rifles were awarded eight Great War battle honours in 1930. These, however, are not related directly to the perpetuated CEF battalions and likely based on the total number of soldiers from the perpetuated units who were known to be at these battles, though possibly dispersed between a number of units.)

One member of the 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion, Lieutenant Frederick William Campbell, was awarded the Victoria Cross. Although chronologically earlier than Milton Gregg’s award, it was through the amalgamation of Regiments in 1954 that this became the second such award to be commemorated with the history of The RCR. In addition to the recognition of Campbell’s VC by The RCR, the Regiment maintains an equal responsibility to recognize all other honours and awards received by members of the perpetuated units.

The 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment (London and Oxford Fusiliers) was established in 1954 with garrisons in London and Woodstock. A third location in Stratford was established in 1965, followed five years later with the close of the Woodstock garrison in 1970. In 1970, with a major reorganization of the Army, the Reserve battalion was re-designated as the 4th Battalion, The RCR, when a new 3rd Battalion was created in the Regular Force establishment. Since 1970, the Reserve Battalion has maintained its garrisons in London and Stratford, Ontario.

Throughout the 1960s, 70s and 80s, and into the 1990s, the Regular Force battalions of The Royal Canadian Regiment served in Canada, Germany and on 13 separate unit rotations in Cyprus. Between 1977 and 1995, the 3rd Commando of the Canadian Airborne Regiment was also a regimental unit of The RCR. As well, a regimental Battle School which trained new infantry soldiers for the Regular Force battalions existed as a separate CF unit between 1978 and 1997.

In 1983, the Regiment marked its centenary with events in all battalions and a major reunion gathering in London, Ontario. In July of that year the Colonel-in-Chief, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, reviewed and addressed the Regiment on parade in London during a trooping of the colours from all four battalions and the affiliated 3 (Airborne) Commando.

The Royal Canadian Regiment has served Canada at home and abroad; including domestic operations ranging from assistance to civil authority during the FLQ Crisis (1970), Akwesasne (1990) and Oka (1990) to emergency response at the Manitoba Floods (1997), the Ice Storm (1998), and Hurricane Juan in Halifax (2003). It was for Op RECUPERATION, the response to the Ice Storm in 1998, that formed elements of all four battalions of the Regiment were deployed simultaneously on a single operation.

Since the 1990s, the Regular Force battalions of The RCR have provided formed units and sub-units to Canada’s missions in the first Gulf War, the Former Yugoslavia, Africa and Afghanistan. All four battalions and the Regiment’s extra-regimentally employed (ERE) personnel have provided individual augmentation to many of Canada’s UN and NATO missions. The Afghanistan mission has included the deployment of formed battle groups based on each of the three Regular Force battalions, and the 4th Battalion has seen the deployment of up to 30 of its officers, NCOs and soldiers at a time depending on available tasks in each operational cycle.

The Royal Canadian Regiment is Canada’s senior Regular Force infantry regiment. Through its amalgamated regiments, the regimental lineage of The RCR dates from 14 August 1863; although 21 December 1883, the creation of the Infantry School Corps, is celebrated as the regimental birthday by regimental tradition.

In 2012, the Canadian Government decided to create battle honours for the War of 1812 and award perpetuations of the recipient War of 1812 units to current units of the Canadian Army. Federal Government announcements identifying awards and the units receiving the perpetuations were made in August and September 2012. As a result of these ammouncements, The Royal canadian Regiment added the Battle Honours “Detroit” and Niagara”, as well as the Honorary Disticntion “Fefence of Canada 181-1815” to its list of honours. These honours represent the perpetuations of the following units of that conflict:

  • 1st Regiment of Middlesex Militia (1812-15)
  • 1st Regiment of Oxford Militia (1812-15)
  • The Loyal London Volunteers

    The four battalions of The Royal Canadian Regiment continue to serve Canada, with regimental garrisons at ASU London (Home Station and 4RCR), CFB Petawawa (Regimental HQ, 1RCR and 3RCR) and CFB Gagetown (2RCR). Extra-Regimentally Employed Royal Canadians serve in units, training establishments and headquarters across the Canadian Forces, both in Canada and abroad.

    Pro Patria

    Prepared by: Capt Michael O’Leary, CD (2011, updated 2013)
    Cap Badge of The Royal Canadian Regiment

    "An eight-pointed diamond cut star; upon the star a raised circle surmounted by the crown; within the raised circle, the block letters "VRI", the Imperial Cypher of Queen Victoria."
    (Description of the badge of The RCR as presented in Regiments and Corps of the Canadian Army, published by the Army Historical Section, 1964)

    Regimental Affiliation:
    Royal Regiment of Fusiliers  Wikipedia-Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

BATTLE HONOURS OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN REGIMENT

Wars and Operations Battle Honour Date
War of 1812 Detroit
Niagara
Defence of Canada – 1812-1815
Défense de Canada
15 Aug 1812
19 Dec 1813 to Sept 1814
North-West Rebellion Saskatchewan
North West Canada 1885
South African War Paardeberg
South Africa 1899-1900
First World War
Summer Operations, 1915. (March-October) Ypres, 1915
Gravenstafel Ridge
St Julien
Festubert, 1915
22 April – 25 May 1915
22-23 April 1915
24 April – 4 May 1915
15-25 May 1915
Local Operations, 1916. (Previous to the Allied Offensive) Mount Sorrel
2-13 June 1916
Operations on the Somme. (1 July – 18 November, 1916) Somme, 1916
Pozieres Ridge
Flers-Courcelette
Ancre Heights
1 July – 18 November 1916
23 July – 3 September 1916
15-22 September 1916
1 October – 11 November 1916
The Arras Offensive (9 April – 15 May, 1917 Arras, 1917
Vimy, 1917
Arleux
Scarpe, 1917
Hill 70
9 April – 4 May 1917
9-14 April 1917
28-29 April 1917
3-4 May 1917
15-25 August 1917
The Flanders Offensive (7 June – 10 November, 1917) Ypres, 1917
Passchendaele
31 July – 10 Nov. 1917
12 October 1917 and/or 26 October – 10 November 1917
The Advance in Picardy (8 August – 3 September, 1918) Amiens
Arras, 1918
Scarpe, 1918
8-11 August 1918
26 August – 3 September 1918
26-30 August 1918
The Breaking of the Hindenburg Line (26 August – 12 October, 1918) Drocourt-Quéant Line
Hindenburg Line, Battles of
Canal du Nord
Cambrai, 1918
2-3 September 1918
12 September – 9 October 1918
27 September – 2 October 1918
8-9 October 1918
Picardy (17 October – 11 November). Pursuit to Mons 11 November 1918
FRANCE AND FLANDERS, 1914-18 FRANCE AND FLANDERS, 1914-18
Second World War
LANDING IN SICILY LANDING IN SICILY 9-12 Jul 43
Agira 24-28 Jul 43
ADRANO ADRANO
Regalbuto
29 Jul – 7 Aug 43
29 Jul - 3 Aug 43
SICILY 1943 SICILY 1943
Landing at Reggio
Motta Montecorvino
Campobasso
Torella
San Leonardo
The Gully
Ortona
9 Jul 43 – 17 Aug 43
3 Sep 43
1-3 Oct 43
11-14 Oct 43
24-27 Oct 43
8-9 Dec 43
10-19 Dec 43
20-28 Dec 43
CASSINO II CASSINO II Gustav Line 11-18 May 44
11-18 May 44
LIRI VALLEY LIRI VALLEY
Hitler Line
18-30 May 44
18-24 May 44
GOTHIC LINE GOTHIC LINE
Misano Ridge
25 Aug-22 Sep 44
3-5 Sep 44
RIMINI LINE RIMINI LINE
San Martino – San Lorenzo
Pisciatello
14-21 Sep 44
14-18 Sep 44
16-19 Sep 44
LAMONE CROSSING LAMONE CROSSING
Fosso Vecchio
2-13 Dec 44
16-18 Dec 44
ITALY 1943-45 ITALY 1943-45 Apeldoorn 3 Sep 43 – 22 Apr 45 11-17 Apr 45
NORTH-WEST EUROPE 1945
Korean War
United Nations Operations - Korea, 1950-1953 KOREA, 1951-1953
Afghanistan War Pashmul, - 2006

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2017 REGIMENTAL STANDING ORDERS



S Coy March, The British Grenadiers



T Coy March, John Peel



Why Does Canada Celebrate Victoria Day?

By Gwyn Evans - May 22, 2022 / 4:00 am | Story: 369589 (Gwyn Evans is the research and communications co-ordinator with the Museum and Archives of Vernon.)

The Victoria Day Long Weekend is long-standing tribute to Queen Victoria and has been celebrated in Vernon for decades LONG LIVE THE QUEEN


HRH Queen Victoria

Although many of us now think of the May Long Weekend as the beginning of camping season in B.C., the history of Victoria Day is a bit more complicated.

In 1845, the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada decided to officially recognize the birthday of Queen Victoria on May 24 with public celebrations. But it wasn’t until 1901, following the Queen’s death, that May 24 became officially known as “Victoria Day” in her memory.

At the turn of the 20th century, the settler population in Vernon eagerly celebrated Queen Victoria’s birthday, as well as her reign in general.

On June 22, 1897, Vernon celebrated the Diamond Jubilee with a series of sporting events, including baseball, lacrosse, trap shootings and tug-of-war.

Other outlying communities, including Enderby, came to compete in the day’s activities, and it is noted that Vernon won all events except the tug-of-war.

May Long Weekends in Vernon were also marked with sporting events and special activities in celebration of the queen’s birthday. On May 24, 1895, a cricket match was held between Kelowna and Vernon, with the SS Fairview offering special trips between the two cities for individuals who wished to attend.

In 1900, Enderby hosted Vernon and other nearby communities for a series of foot, horse and canoe races. A football match was also held between the community of Lumby and employees of the Coldstream Ranch, followed by a grand ball in Morand’s Hall.

Queen Victoria’s passing in 1901 was announced in large font on the front page of the January 24th edition of the Vernon News, as the City mourned the loss of its “Most Respected Sovereign.” Later that year, Vernon officially celebrated “Victoria Day” for the first time, with — you guessed it — sporting events, including three-legged and ladies races.

Queen Victoria: The woman who redefined Britain’s monarchy

A headstrong head of state

Queen Victoria restored the reputation of a monarchy tarnished by the extravagance of her royal uncles. She also shaped a new role for the Royal Family, reconnecting it with the public through civic duties.

At just 4ft 11in tall, Victoria was a towering presence as a symbol of her Empire. She and her husband Albert and their nine children came to symbolise a new, confident age. Read more





4RCR COUNCIL

Terms of Reference

Overview
29. The 4 RCR Council deals with matters unique to 4 RCR’s status as a Primary Reserve unit. The Council’s focus is to ensure the overall well-being of the 4th Battalion within The RCR and to ensure that 4 RCR’s interests are represented at The Regimental Council. The 4 RCR Council9 exists as a separate component of The Regimental Council, reporting through the 4 RCR Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel to the Colonel of The Regiment, but dealing only with matters pertaining to 4 RCR. The 4 RCR Council is represented at The RCR Senate by the 4 RCR Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel as well as any serving RCR General Officers from the Primary Reserve. The CO and RSM of 4RCR will represent the 4 RCR Council at the Regimental Executive Committee.

Prior to 2014 it was known as the 4 RCR Board of Governors.

Role
30. The aim of the 4 RCR Council is to provide the CO of 4 RCR with advice and guidance on all matters that might affect the long-term well-being of 4 RCR.

Composition
31. The 4 RCR Council consists of the Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel and the following:

Chairperson – a member of the Council appointed by the Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel.

Members:
Past Honorary Lieutenant-Colonels of 4 RCR;
CO 4 RCR
RSM 4 RCR
Former CO’s of 4RCR
Former RSM’s of 4RCR
Any advisors approved as Council members; to include the President of the Home Station Branch of The RCR Association and a representative from The RCR Museum Board of Directors. Other individuals selected and approved for membership by the Council.

32. Past Honorary Lieutenant-Colonels, CO’s, and RSM’s may decline active membership in the 4 RCR Council. These personnel will not be expected to attend Council meetings nor will they be Part of the Council’s voting quorum however they will be kept informed on the work of the Council through meeting minutes.

Work Focus
33. In support of 4 RCR’s distinct nature, the 4 RCR Council will focus its activities on the following:
Assisting the CO to select a suitable candidate for the position of Honorary Lieutenant-Colonel;
Participation in matters that relate specifically to 4 RCR’s status as a unit of the Primary Reserve;
Assisting the CO in the management and use of NPF (The Fusilier Fund) as required;
Assisting the Battalion with specific projects or activities; and
Assisting the Battalion with community outreach.

Executive Committee
34. The Executive Committee is a working group of the 4 RCR Council. It consists of the Chairperson and three members elected from the Council, one being the Council Secretary. The purpose of the committee is to oversee or carry out specific tasks agreed to by the Council. This includes conducting research and making recommendations on pertinent matters. The committee will also determine the agenda for Council meetings.

Meetings 35. 4 RCR Council meetings will take place quarterly. Executive meetings will take place quarterly as a minimum but may be called at any time by the chair.




4RCR COUNCIL
Membership List
Last Name First Name Rank E-mail Phone Posn
Anderson MartinLColmartin_anderson@rogers.comMember
Bassarab Rusty LColrbassarab@cogeco.caMember
Bell Dave Captdavidbell@tcc.on.caWebmaster
BoonArtCWO190 Queen St, Stratford, ON,N5A 4N7Member
BurkeJeffCWOburkeja54@outlook.comMember
Campbell Mark BGen mcamp@rogers.comMember
Cook John Lcol John_cook_9@yahoo.ca 519-668-7595Member
DenneDonColdjdenne@msn.comAssn Rep
Ellyatt David CWO dellyatt@police.london.caMember
Graham Barry Lcol barrygraham533@hotmail.com Member
Griffin Declan Lcol dgriffin@wightman.caMember
Hutton GeoffMaj geoff.hutton@sympatico.caMember
Klausnitzer Henry CWO hklaosni@london.ca Member
LucasCurtisMWOcurtis_is@rogers.comMember
Mombourquette John Capt fj3@rogers.com Secretary
O'Brien Gary Bgen gary.obrien@hotmail.comChairperson
O'Leary Mike Captm.m.oleary@gmail.comMuseum rep
Olglesby John Lcol Member
O'QuinnJohnMajjohnandglad@rogers.comCadet rep
PrinceMattMajmatt.a.prince@gmail.comMember
Rennie Bob CWO bobandninaare@gmail.comMember
ReintjesPeteLCol peter.reintjes@forces.gc.caCO
RobinsonJosephLcoljwrobins2@gmail.comMember
St. GeorgeGaryCWO519-453-5321Member
Stapleton Mike MWO mstaple362@rogers.comMember
Talach Rob CWO rtalach@ledroitbeckett.com Member
Weldon Doug Lcol doug.weldon@yahoo.ca Member
Willaert Gary Lcol rcrgary@yahoo.ca Member



Former Serving Members
"Once a Royal Canadian, always a Royal Canadian!"

4RCR is currently updating its former members database to provide former serving members with social events, re-unions, mailings and to provide a means for former members to keep in contact with each other.

NEW MEMBERS:

All former members who have served with The London and Oxford Fusiliers, 3RCR(M) or 4RCR are invited to submit their particulars to the WEBMASTER for publication in the Former Members List.

CURRENT MEMBERS:

NOTE: If you are a member and updating your current information, note same.

Only your Name, Rank and E-mail Address and phone number (if submitted) will be published on our Former Members List.

You will be sent a password to enter the Former Members List once your application has been approved.

Former Members List



Male Veteran or First-Responders (VFR), 50 years or older, facing a key career change?

...then this program may be of benefit to you

Submitted by Barry Graham
2022-07-28

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 2022-07-26 16:00 (GMT-05:00)

To: president@vimylondon.ca, vp1@vimylondon.ca, vp2@vimylondon.ca, vp3@vimylondon.ca

Subject: Online Meaning-Centered Men's Group

Good afternoon, Members of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 145,

This email is sent on behalf of Dr. Marnin Heisel, clinical psychologist and researcher at Western University in London, Ontario.

I am writing to tell you about a voluntary program that will be offered to male Veterans and First-Responders (VFR), 50 years of age or older, who are facing a key career transition.

Meaning-Centered Men’s Groups (MCMG) were designed to help promote well-being and prevent the development of psychological difficulties. These groups have already shown promise with men over the age of 55 who were concerned about or struggling with the transition to retirement; we now plan to evaluate them with VFR in career transition.

This study is being funded by Movember, and will involve men who have transitioned out of the military or from a police, fire, or emergency medical service in the past 2 years, or anticipate doing so within the next few years.

I am hoping that you might be willing to pass along information about our research study to male VFR, who are 50 years or older, reside in Ontario, and are facing such a career transition.

Those who wish to participate would be invited to take part in a 45-75 minute research interview to determine their eligibility for this study. Those eligible would then be invited to participate in a 12-week course of 90-120-minute group sessions with 10-12 men, and 2-3 facilitators. They may also be asked to complete up to 5 additional research interviews lasting 60-90 minutes each over the coming year to evaluate the groups. Participants initially assigned to join a Wait-List will be given the opportunity to join a future men’s group, after completion of post- group assessments. Participation is completely voluntary.

All study assessments and initial courses of MCMG groups will be offered online/virtually. Laptops may be made available to those who don’t have one. Depending on the state of the pandemic, and as pandemic-related public health restrictions lessen, we may offer future group sessions in-person. Please feel free to be in touch if you have any questions or concerns about this study or would like to discuss it further. If you know someone who you feel might be appropriate for this study, please feel free to provide them with my contact information or contact me yourself.

With sincere thanks for your consideration.

Dr. Marnin J. Heisel, Ph.D., C.Psych. Associate Professor,
Departments of Psychiatry and of Epidemiology & Biostatistics Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry,
The University of Western Ontario
Scientist, Lawson Health Research Institute,
Parkwood Institute Mental Health Care Building
550 Wellington Road, Office #F4-365, London, Ontario, N6C-0A7 Phone: (519) 685-8500, ext. 75981
E-Mail: Marnin.Heisel@lhsc.on.ca

Thank you,

Rebecca Hocke, B.Sc.,
Research Assistant
Lawson Health Research Institute
w: http://meaningfulgroups.com




Important Information For All Veterans
Soldiers Aid Commission Presentation to The RCL

Submitted by John Cook
2022-07-23



Read More...



Countering disinformation with facts - Russian invasion of Ukraine

2022-07-09

The Kremlin has long spread disinformation and propaganda to achieve its objectives. It continues to disseminate lies to justify its unprovoked, unjustifiable invasion of Ukraine. Below, you will find a sample of the many lies by the Russian regime about its invasion of Ukraine, along with the truth. This information is based on Government of Canada intelligence.

You can limit the spread of disinformation by knowing how to identify it and being critical about what you read. Continues...



Changes to the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Changes to the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions
2022-07-08

On this page

  • General
  • Details

General

Why are changes to the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions being introduced now?

Discussions have been ongoing for quite some time – the decision to update the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions was not made lightly, and much thought was given to the approach because of the exacting specifications as to the dress and appearance of our military in various scenarios. Many discussions were required, including with the Defence Advisory Groups, Gender Advisors, with current military members as well as the next generation of Canadians who will follow us. The bottom line is, the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions are about fifty years old and so the policy as a whole was overdue for revision. The appearance of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) has not kept pace with the Canadian society which it serves.

When will the changes to the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions take effect?

The updated Dress Instructions will take effect in early September 2022. This will allow time for CAF Members and leaders at all levels to review and understand the changes.

Who makes the decisions about the Dress Instructions? Is there some process you follow or is your Dress and Ceremonial Section just doing what it feels is appropriate?

In the matter of military dress and appearance, the Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) and Chief of Military Personnel (through the Dress and Ceremonial Section of the Directorate of History and Heritage) are advised by:

the environmental Commanders of the Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army and Royal Canadian Air Force, who are the principal advisers on Navy, Army and Air Force distinctive environmental uniforms (DEU);
the National Defence Clothing and Dress Committee (NDCDC), chaired by Assistant CMP, which provides the focal point for coordinating the views of all environments and organizations, and approves routine changes within established policy (see paragraphs 11. to 14.); and
personnel branch advisers, who submit routine comments through the NDCDC.
In accordance with the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions, Commanders of Commands are delegated the authority to establish rules for the design and wear of their respective operational orders of dress.

Commanders at all levels are charged with ensuring that personnel under their command, whether environmentally or extra-environmentally employed, are dressed in accordance with the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions.

What if a CAF member’s religious beliefs require them to dress in a way that isn’t covered by the new Dress Instructions? Or conversely, what if their appearance does not conform to the regulations outlined in Section 2 – Appearance but it conforms to their cultural beliefs?

One of the goals of the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions update was to make the rules more inclusive and therefore limit the need for accommodations. However, accommodations will always be available to CAF members who have special requirements related to religious or spiritual belief. Members should communicate these requirements with their chain of command, as leaders retain the right to order restrictions based on the need to meet safety and operational requirements.

The following text has been removed: “Behaviour such as chewing gum, slouching, placing hands in pockets, smoking or eating on the street and walking hand in hand, is forbidden.” Does that mean CAF members can now do all those things when in uniform?

Pursuant to QR&O 17.02, the deportment and appearance of all ranks, in uniform or when wearing civilian attire, shall on all occasions reflect credit on the CAF and the individual. It is the responsibility and duty of all CAF members to ensure that, while in uniform, they comport themselves in a manner which projects a positive military appearance. Leaders at all levels have a role to play in this regard.

What happens if a CAF member doesn’t follow the updated Dress Instructions?

When a uniform is required to be worn, all CAF members shall wear the applicable uniform described in this manual in accordance with the instructions contained herein. Pursuant to QR&O 17.02, the deportment and appearance of all ranks, in uniform or when wearing civilian attire, shall on all occasions reflect credit on the CAF and the individual. It is the responsibility and duty of all CAF members to ensure that, by their vigilance, actions and example, the policies, regulations and instructions contained herein are adhered to.

Are any more changes expected to the Dress Instructions?

The update is occurring in three phases. The first phase involves a rewrite of critical policy where significant change is necessary (Section 2, Chapter 2); changing exclusive or gendered language to inclusive throughout the policy; and reducing the need for accommodations. Also as part of this phase, the Logistik online clothing catalogue was opened to all members in September 2021, so that clothing choice was no longer restricted by gender. Later phases of the update will revisit the functional authority changes from 2017 (where each Environment has its own specifications); change terminology in catalogues and supply manuals; and make design changes to the clothing itself.

Going forward, the intention is to continually review the updated Dress Instructions, in order to provide additional clarity where necessary and to include any elements previously overlooked.

Details

Can the different gender design of the DEU uniforms be intermixed or must CAF members only wear either the “female” pattern or the “male” pattern?

DEUs are no longer gender based. Both catalogues are open to all members and they may be intermixed. CAF members may choose whichever design best fits, as long as it is worn as per the Dress Instructions. Some restrictions may be imposed in certain circumstances such as on parade.

References to gender have been removed but traditionally gendered items like skirts, nylons, and purses are still part of CAF dress. Does this mean that CAF members who identify as men can wear skirts?

Yes, it does. The overall aim of the updated Canadian Forces Dress Instructions is to make the policy more inclusive and less prohibitive, and to allow CAF members increased freedom to make personal choices regarding their appearance, providing that safety and operational effectiveness are always maintained.

Will recruits need to shave their head on basic training?

No, the updated hair policy applies to all CAF members from recruitment to retirement.

Is there a maximum length for hair?

No, there are no restrictions on the length of hair. However, long hair must be tied when extending below the top/ridge of the shoulder or that extends below the service dress collar for ceremonial occasion. It must not prevent the proper wear of headdress and must not impede the visibility of the member’s face. Safety and operational requirements shall be met.

What types of braids are considered acceptable?

Any style braid(s) may be used, as long as it remains in line with safety and operational requirements. Hair must be tied to ensure the headdress can be worn properly and the face is visible. A bun, braids, or ponytail are examples of appropriate ways to tie the hair. Specific exceptions are listed at DAOD 5340-3.

Is unnatural-coloured hair acceptable in ceremonial orders of dress? And must accessories match the colour of hair?

Yes, the colouring of hair is permitted in all orders of dress unless it inhibits an operational duty. For example, bright coloured hair may have a negative operational impact during field operations or training. Leaders are invited to discuss with their members to find a simple, suitable accommodation, such as a scarf to cover the hair. Accessories do not have to match the colour of the member’s hair. However, all accessories shall meet safety and operational requirements and not must not discredit the CAF.

Is there any change on the beard policy?

Yes, the wearing of sideburns, beards, moustaches and goatees, or combination of style, is authorized for all members of the CAF from recruitment to release. There is no maximum or minimum length. Only, they must be kept neatly groomed and symmetrical in style while always complying with safety requirements and operational requirements.

Can CAF members be asked to shave their facial hair?

Yes, Commanders of Commands, Task Force Commanders, Formation Commanders and Commanding Officers retain the right to order restrictions on the wearing of facial hair to meet safety and operational requirements. This instruction does not supersede Federal or National safety codes or regulations.

Since multiple facial hair styles are approved, must a person request a period of transition for each change in facial hair?

No, as long as it is neat and evenly trimmed. For example, a member going from a goatee to a full beard should shave down the goatee so facial hair appears evenly and symmetrically trimmed.

Are tattoos on the face permitted? And what is considered the face?

The face is the front part of the head that extends from the forehead to the chin and from the anterior part of one ear to the other. Tattoos are permitted on the face as long as they conform to the regulations outlined in Section 2 – Appearance. “Tattoos that the member knows, or ought to know, are associated with criminal activities (e.g. criminal gangs), tattoos that promote and/or express, on the basis of a prohibited ground of discrimination as defined in the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA), the following: hatred, violence, discrimination, or harassment: and tattoos that a CAF member knows, or ought to know, promote and/or express: racism, sexism, misogyny, xenophobia, homophobia, ableism, or sexual explicit material.”

Are hoops and long earrings acceptable in uniform?

Yes, ear piercings, hoops and spacers are authorized but can be no more than 2.5 cm in length from the bottom of the ear. Safety and operational requirements must always be met. Spacers must not extend 2.5 cm in diameter. In all ceremonial orders of dress (No. 1), only one single stud type (one in each ear) is permitted in the lobe not to exceed 1 cm.

What jewelry is acceptable for ceremonial orders of dress?

The following is acceptable:

Rings: a maximum of two rings which are not of a costume jewelry nature. Additional rings may only be worn when they indicate professional standing, such as an engineer, or are worn with a wedding band as a single set indicating betrothal or fidelity, e.g., an engagement or an anniversary ring. Rings shall not inhibit the execution of proper arms drill or cause an unsightly bulge in white or black gloves.
Necklaces and bracelets: shall not be visible;
Piercing's: the only piercing jewelry authorized are single or single set of stud or single stone earrings (one in each ear) in the earlobe(s) only. Piercing's are not permitted on the face. Earrings shall not exceed one centimeter square or diameter. Gauges/spacers shall not exceed 2.5 cm in diameter.
Plain tie-pins or clips or with a Canadian military insignia are permitted.

In operational dress (order of dress 5), is there a limit to the number of ear-piercing's that are acceptable?

In general, there are no restrictions unless there is a safety issue or operational effectiveness may be jeopardized.

Following both the jewelry and piercing's policy, can two piercing's be connected with a chain in one ear?

Yes, as long as both piercing's and chain are within 2.5 cm in diameter or length, and safety or operational effectiveness is not compromised. However, only one single stud (max 1 cm) or spacer(max 2.5 cm) per ear is authorized in ceremonial orders of dress (order of dress No. 1).

If a CAF member recently had their upper ear pierced and cannot remove this earring for 2 months, what should they do when asked to wear a ceremonial order of dress?

Members should communicate with their chain of command to find a solution.

Can CAF members with eye lash extensions be ordered to have them removed?

Yes, if they affect operational duties, as in the case of wearing night-vision goggles (NVGs).

Are CAF members permitted to have long fingernails in uniform?

Yes, long fingernails are permitted so long as they do not impede the member’s ability to perform their duties. An example of this is being unable to do weapons drills due to long fingernails. Safety and operational requirements must always be met.

Are CAF members required to wear gloves at all times while wearing a toque?

No, gloves do not need to be worn when the toque is worn or vice versa. The toque is authorized as alternative winter headdress and can be worn with all orders of dress.

Are sunglasses permitted for wear on a ceremonial parade? Are transition (photochromic) lenses, mirrored lenses and clip-ons permitted?

Yes, sunglasses are permitted for wear in all orders of dress, including ceremonial (No. 1) dress. Eyeglasses and sunglasses are permitted for wear in all orders of dress, including transition lenses, mirrored lenses, and clip-on lenses.

Are backpacks required to be slung over both shoulders?

A backpack can be worn slung over both shoulders, or over the left shoulder; this leaves the right arm free to salute.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Editors note:

There have been many responses to the updated Canadian Forces Dress Regulations recently released and due to come into effect in September of this year. None of these comments were positive and shock, disbelief and dismay were expressed by the writers. These comments are still pouring in. Some of these comments are:

  • “Scary!”
  • “I am speechless in my revulsion in what has taken place in the CAF!”
  • “This policy was overdue for revision, 'in whose opinion?' and why would anyone listen to them? It's a frickin' freak show!”
  • “Not the same as we once knew it!”
  • “You will hear nothing from the (Canadian) public on this because they are deaf, dumb and mute when it comes to their military!”
The last statement is not entirely true because veterans are also the public and there are a great many of us who are speaking out against this flagrant disregard for the sanctity of discipline, deportment, conformity and pride in one's own bearing.

Canadian veterans, understand the pressure from self interest, minority groups on the Government to conform to their standards but if we acquiesce to these standards the CAF will lose its own proud identity and become a mongrel without a definable identity that garners the respect it has earned around the world through hard work and sacrifice.

When a military loses its self respect and discipline it becomes a sea of discontent and no longer able to perform with dedication and purpose. The military is not a nine to five job, nor can it be. It is a family with many brothers and sisters. Dedication and purpose go hand in hand with self respect, discipline, deportment and pride in ones own unit and traditions.

David Bell



4RCR Council Report

NTR


4RCR CO's Report

NTR

Monthly Social Events Calendar

DateTimeEventDressLocnRemarks
Fri 09 Sep 2022 1330 for 1400 Pashmul(2) TBA (TBA)Victory Branch RCL Stapleton/Graham
Sun 23 Oct 2022 1130 for 1200 Kowang San Lunch(2) TBA (TBA)Victory Branch RCL Stapleton/Graham
Wed 21 Dec 2022 1130 for 1200 Regimental Birthday(2) TBA (TBA)Victory Branch RCL Stapleton/Graham
NOTES:
(1) Denotes meal preceded by AGM.
(2) Denotes meal served
(3) Locations are as yet "To Be Confirmed"
as the Legion venue may not be dsesired by
membership based on prices for meals, however
Victory Branch has been tentatively booked.





The RCR Regimental Museum

RCRM DIGITAL
January 2021

We are very happy to welcome everyone from everywhere to our community!

We continue to remain active online while observing the restrictions recently enforced by the Province of Ontario. Our website offers interactive activities, online or printable games, as well as lessons for elementary and secondary levels. The online guided tours and drop-in Wednesday live streaming will resume once the Province of Ontario rescinds the current stay-at-home order. Until then, educational videos are available through the museum's Youtube channel.

Stay connected and become a Subscriber.

The museum is not charging membership fees, but financial donations are appreciated (payments by cheque preferred, credit cards also accepted).

COLLECTIONS

Stories from the Collection highlight artifacts in our holdings, as well as the fascinating stories they bring to light. This month's story features The Royals of CFB Baden-Soellingen. It was 3RCR's hockey team, and they competed in the Canadian Forces Europe Hockey League (CFEHL) from 1977 to 1984. The team won the CFEHL championship in 1980 and 1981. Were you or someone you know involved in this league? We would love to hear your story, just email us!

EVENTS

Season 2 of the RCRM Speakers Series was launched on 21 Jan, with Professor Gord Heath and his reflections on The Trauma of War and the Rise of Religious Pacifism in the Interwar Years, 1919-1939. This season will explore various aspects of loss in the context of military conflict. Complex facets of the dynamic between mourning and commemoration, deprivation and rejection or disposal of war by-products surface.

PODCAST

All 10 episodes of the RCRM Speakers Series Season 1 are now available via Simplecast, Apple Podcasts or Spotify.




The RCR Association



RE: August Newsletter from The RCR Association HQ

From: Sandy McQuarrie
2022-08-13

MEA CULPA

A long time ago, I learned that it is better to admit your mistakes than try to bluff through them (courtesy of some great NCOs)
In this month's newsletter, I made two mistakes - one about Afghanistan veterans on the Board and another about the title of John Barnes book.
To be precise, we have four veterans from the Afghanistan campaign on the Board. As mention, both Jon Cox and John Barnes were there. However, I forgot to include Anthony Jones and Jim Davis. They were there as well.
I have been working with John on his book for over two years. I said the title is White House, Black Memories, it actually is White School, Black Memories.
My apologies to all!

So, my mistake. I stand ready to do extras!

Sandy McQuarrie, Chair



August Newsletter from The RCR Association HQ

From: Sandy McQuarrie
2022-08-10

Renewals of Membership

On 7 August, our membership list showed that we had 288 members in the Lapsed category.
A few weeks ago, one member raised a concern about having to 'renew' his membership every year. His issue was that it took too much time away from many other things he wanted to do. He also felt that if his information had not changed, why should he review it?
He has a point!
So why do we continue to insist that you 'renew' your membership? The simple answer is that we must ensure that your contact and membership details are current.
Our membership software is set to remind you that you need to review your information with nine reminders – 60, 30, and 7 days before your membership status is posted as lapsed; and 7, 14, 30, 60, 90, and 365 days after the lapse date. Each of these reminders includes detailed instructions on how to complete the renewal. Your application is marked as inactive if you do not renew within the year.
The process is simple.
Go to thercr.ca/main/ and click on the "Members Login" tab. Next, click on the "My Account" tab and select the "Membership" tab in the drop-down menu. On this page, you will see a Renewal Reminder badge. Click on the "Renew now" button and follow the guided steps.
If you find that this is not easy, send an email to thercrassociation@gmail.com, and we will help you.
As an aside, I have asked the owner of Member365 to tell me if we can add a button to the reminder saying "No Change."

Reunion 140

Planning for the Reunion is about to swing into high gear. LCol Jon Cox has agreed to join the Committee as the serving members' representative. He is a welcome addition!
A meeting to add details to the program is scheduled in London during the last week of September. It is anticipated that more information will be available after that meeting.
For planning purposes, we will soon conduct a short survey on the 140th Reunion.

Bursary Program

The deadline for this year's bursary applications is drawing to a close. The good news is that The RCR Trust has increased the bursary amount from $12k to $20k. What this means is that we will be awarding ten (rather than six) bursaries this year.

Fundraising for the Milton F Gregg, VC Documentary

Your Association's fundraiser for the documentary about one of the Regiment's VC winners (Milton F Gregg) started on 1 April and is scheduled to be closed on 31 December this year.
The aim is to raise $35k of the $250k needed to produce this film. So far, the amount raised to date is $3000, so we still have a long way to go if we are to reach our aim. (BTW, many thanks to those who have already donated, especially Howard Clark, whose $1000 is very generous.)
The Great War Society's brochure on the documentary can be seen HERE.
Please consider donating! Any amount of $100 or over gets a tax receipt.
To donate, click HERE.

White House, Black Memories

CWO (Ret'd) John Barnes' book titled "White House, Black Memories" will be published on 10 August. It is a great read that Afghanistan veterans (and all other Royal Canadians) will enjoy.
To purchase a copy, go to https://amzn.to/3zFtqKF. If you enter a review, it will assist in getting a higher rating on Amazon, leading to increased sales.
As well as a good story about life in The RCR, John has agreed that all his sales revenue will be donated to the Homes for Heroes Foundation. To learn more about this organization, click HERE.
Support a fellow Royal Canadian and Homes For Heroes by purchasing the book.

The Upper Ottawa Valley Branch

A group of Royal Canadians in the area around Petawawa (led by Jim Murnaghan) has completed the necessary steps to revitalize the Upper Ottawa Branch. Congratulations to all involved.
As noted in the Upcoming Events, the Branch is hosting a Pashmul Day event in Petawawa on 17 September. The new Afghanistan Memorial will be on display there. The CoTR and LGen (Ret’d) Omer Lavoie will be in attendance. Contact Jim at jimmurn@gmail.com to get the details on how you can join them.

The RCR Participation in the AMF(L)

As many of you know, battalions of the Regiment served in the AMF(L) for many years. In fact, three Canadians commanded the Force during the lifetime of the Force. The last one was our own Walter Holmes.
In 1983, when I was CO of 1RCR, the RSM, 30 soldiers from the unit, and I attended a Change of Command Parade when MGen Mike Reynolds (UK) handed command over to MGen Andy Christie (CA). At that time, I presented Gen Reynolds with an Andy Gauthier statue of a Canadian Infantryman. (See photo)
Recently, the Reynolds Family approached me to see if The RCR Museum would be interested in having the statue returned to commemorate him. (He died on 21 October 2015). Recently, they agreed to the donation.
Walter and I are trying to convince the Director of The RCR Museum to build a display of the Regiment's involvement with the AMF(L). Many of you participated in exercises as part of the AMF(L), and I am sure you agree that we need to tell the story of this part of the Regiment's history.

Association Leadership

The leadership of the Association is composed of a Board of Directors with 12 members. According to our By-Laws, Directors shall, collectively as a Board, deliberate, decide on, direct and supervise the management of the activities and affairs of the Association. The Board is made up as follows:
A minimum of five (5) and a maximum of seven (7) Directors directly elected by Ordinary Resolution of the Members and who are not serving as Branch Presidents: and
A minimum of three (3) and a maximum of five (5) Directors, who shall be elected by Ordinary Resolution of Members from among the serving Branch Presidents.
Currently, we have these Royal Canadians serving as Directors:
  • Sandy McQuarrie....... Chair;
  • Leo Boyd.................... President, the CWO Bobby Girouard (Alberta) Branch;
  • Eric Christensen;
  • Mark Connolly........... Recording Secretary;
  • Jim Davis.................. President, the Kingston Branch;
  • Geordie Elms............. President, the GTARCR Branch;
  • Anthony Jones;
  • Bob Near................... President, the Ottawa Branch;
  • John Redmon............ Treasurer;
  • Jon Cox;
  • Mike Stapleton........... President, The Home Station, (London) Branch; and
  • John Barnes.
Of the seven Directors (who are not Branch Presidents), two are serving members (Jon Cox and Anthony Jones), two Afghanistan veteran (John Barnes and Jon Cox), and the rest are Cold War veterans.
We are currently on the hunt for a future Chair. If you are interested, contact me.

Pro Patria

Sandy



Recent Passings

A Soldier Died Today

by A. Lawrence Vaincourt

He was getting old and paunchy and his hair was falling fast,
And he sat around the Legion, telling stories of the past.
Of a war that he had fought in and the deeds that he had done,
In his exploits with his buddies; they were heroes, every one.

And tho' sometimes, to his neighbors, his tales became a joke,
All his Legion buddies listened, for they knew whereof he spoke.
But we'll hear his tales no longer for old Bill has passed away,
And the world's a little poorer, for a soldier died today.

He will not be mourned by many, just his children and his wife,
For he lived an ordinary and quite uneventful life.
Held a job and raised a family, quietly going his own way,
And the world won't note his passing, though a soldier died today.

When politicians leave this earth, their bodies lie in state,
While thousands note their passing and proclaim that they were great.
Papers tell their whole life stories, from the time that they were young,
But the passing of a soldier goes unnoticed and unsung.

Is the greatest contribution to the welfare of our land
A guy who breaks his promises and cons his fellow man?
Or the ordinary fellow who, in times of war and strife,
Goes off to serve his Country and offers up his life?

A politician's stipend and the style in which he lives
Are sometimes disproportionate to the service that he gives.
While the ordinary soldier, who offered up his all,
Is paid off with a medal and perhaps, a pension small.

It's so easy to forget them for it was so long ago,
That the old Bills of our Country went to battle, but we know
It was not the politicians, with their compromise and ploys,
Who won for us the freedom that our Country now enjoys.

Should you find yourself in danger, with your enemies at hand,
Would you want a politician with his ever-shifting stand?
Or would you prefer a soldier, who has sworn to defend
His home, his kin and Country and would fight until the end?

He was just a common soldier and his ranks are growing thin,
But his presence should remind us we may need his like again.
For when countries are in conflict, then we find the soldier's part
Is to clean up all the troubles that the politicians start.

If we cannot do him honor while he's here to hear the praise,
Then at least let's give him homage at the ending of his days.
Perhaps just a simple headline in a paper that would say,
Our Country is in mourning, for a soldier died today.

© 1987 A. Lawrence Vaincourt


In Memorium
NTR



Member Submissions
We Are Canadian

The following link takes you to the song We Are Canadian recently composed by Ellis Craig, an 83-year-old resident of a retirement home in Perth, Ontario.
A stirring and patriotic ribute to all Canadians but especially those who have fought for and served this great land.
http://canadiansatarms.ca/we-are-canadian/

Note From Webmaster:

This is YOUR page to keep informed on members health, welfare and happenings.
Your input is very important and submissions should be sent to: davidbell@tcc.on.ca Subject: website submission.
Please send submissions before the last week of the month so we can post them up by the beginning of the next month.
Photos should have date taken, event or function and persons depicted.



The execution of a Ukrainian prisoner: the commanders of a Tuvan-sadist were identified

Published By: journalist Dmytro Replyanchuk.
Submitted By: Mike Stapleton
2022-08-15

565,895 views Aug 14, 2022 Genitals were cut off, and then person was executed. Footage of Russian atrocities against a Ukrainian soldier in the Luhansk region, who was held captive by the occupiers, was posted on Russian propaganda media. We found the commanders of a unit of Russian executioners who murdered an Ukrainian soldier, and even after his death continued to abuse his body. Find out who they are in the article of journalist Dmytro Replyanchuk.

  • 00:00 - introduction
  • 00:16 - Akhmat unit and its crimes
  • 01:46 — commander of the "Akhmat" unit Dmitriy Kobreev with the nickname "Cobra"
  • 04:42 — deputy commander of the "Akhmat" unit Mikhail Chilingaryan with the nickname "Raf"
  • 05:54 — fellow traitor of the Russian executioner Ochura-Suge Mongush

watch video


We Have Never Been Here Before

By: Thomas Friedman
2022-02-25
Submitted by: Brian Colgate/Barry Graham
2022-08-13


A Soviet-era statue in Oleksandriya, Ukraine, titled “Knowledge Is Strength” was transformed a few weeks ago to include a Ukrainian flag.
Photo credit: Brendan Hoffman for The New York Times


By Thomas L. Friedman
Opinion Columnist, The New York Times

The seven most dangerous words in journalism are: “The world will never be the same.” In over four decades of reporting, I have rarely dared use that phrase. But I’m going there now in the wake of Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.
Our world is not going to be the same again because this war has no historical parallel. It is a raw, 18th-century-style land grab by a superpower — but in a 21st-century globalized world. This is the first war that will be covered on TikTok by super-empowered individuals armed only with smartphones, so acts of brutality will be documented and broadcast worldwide without any editors or filters. On the first day of the war, we saw invading Russian tank units unexpectedly being exposed by Google maps, because Google wanted to alert drivers that the Russian armor was causing traffic jams.
You have never seen this play before.
Yes, the Russian attempt to seize Ukraine is a throwback to earlier centuries — before the democracy revolutions in America and France — when a European monarch or Russian czar could simply decide that he wanted more territory, that the time was ripe to grab it, and so he did. And everyone in the region knew he would devour as much as he could and there was no global community to stop him.
In acting this way today, though, Putin is not only aiming to unilaterally rewrite the rules of the international system that have been in place since World War II — that no nation can just devour the nation next door — he is also out to alter that balance of power that he feels was imposed on Russia after the Cold War.
That balance — or imbalance in Putin’s view — was the humiliating equivalent of the Versailles Treaty’s impositions on Germany after World War I. In Russia’s case, it meant Moscow having to swallow NATO’s expansion not only to include the old Eastern European countries that had been part of the Soviet Union’s sphere of influence, like Poland, but even, in principle, states that were part of the Soviet Union itself, like Ukraine.
I see many people citing Robert Kagan’s fine book “The Jungle Grows Back” as a kind of shorthand for the return of this nasty and brutish style of geopolitics that Putin’s invasion manifests. But that picture is incomplete. Because this is not 1945 or 1989. We may be back in the jungle — but today the jungle is wired. It is wired together more intimately than ever before by telecommunications; satellites; trade; the internet; road, rail and air networks; financial markets; and supply chains. So while the drama of war is playing out within the borders of Ukraine, the risks and repercussions of Putin’s invasion are being felt across the globe — even in China, which has good cause to worry about its friend in the Kremlin.
Welcome to World War Wired — the first war in a totally interconnected world. This will be the Cossacks meet the World Wide Web. Like I said, you haven’t been here before.
“It’s been less than 24 hours since Russia invaded Ukraine, yet we already have more information about what’s going on there than we would have in a week during the Iraq war,” wrote Daniel Johnson, who served as an infantry officer and journalist with the U.S. Army in Iraq, in Slate on Thursday afternoon. “What is coming out of Ukraine is simply impossible to produce on such a scale without citizens and soldiers throughout the country having easy access to cellphones, the internet and, by extension, social media apps. A large-scale modern war will be livestreamed, minute by minute, battle by battle, death by death, to the world. What is occurring is already horrific, based on the information released just on the first day.”
See more-Feb 25th, 2022



Kremlin Desperation in Ukraine


Russia dangles freedom to prisoners if they fight in Ukraine. Many are taking the deadly gamble.

By: Nick Paton Walsh, Daria Markina, Sebastian Shukla, Oleksandra Ochman and Darya Tarasova, CNN
Updated 6:35 PM ET, Tue August 9, 2022

Submitted by: David Bell
2022-08-10


Photo by: Anna Tamila via Shutterstock

(CNN)Promises of freedom and riches are made to convicts in cramped jail cells. Frantic phone calls ensue between relatives and inmates weighing the offer. Then prisoners vanish, leaving their loved ones to sift through reports of the wounded arriving in hospitals. This scene is playing out in the convict communities across Russia. With a regular army stretched thin after nearly six months of a disastrously executed and bloody invasion of Ukraine, there's increasing evidence that the Kremlin is making ugly choices in its ugly war and recruiting Russia's prisoners to fight.
Continued



Russian Cruise and Conventional Weapons

Published: PERUN/YouTube.com
Submitted by: Mike Stapleton
2022-08-08

An interesting video on Russia;s Cruise & ballistic missiles in Ukraine - effectiveness, lessons (and are the Russians running out?)

219,112 views Aug 7, 2022 Russia (and the USSR before it) has always placed great emphasis on its missile and rocket forces. Whether the threat to be countered was NATO aircraft, shipping, or ground targets, the Russian military has always looked to relatively advanced missile systems as the answer.

And so, when the February invasion opened, many observers expected Russia to commence its campaign with a barrage of modern cruise and ballistic missiles, the famous Kalibr and Iskander missiles, destroying Ukrainian command and communications infrastructure. Instead, what followed was a relatively limited campaign the achieved, at best, the temporary suppression of the Ukrainian air forces and air defences.

As the war evolved however, Russia broadened its list of targets and started inflicting a greater toll on Ukrainian targets. For their part, the Ukrainians introduced their own new family of missiles - the GLMRS of HIMARS fame.

In this video I look at that initial missile campaign, the way the campaign evolved subsequently, and what lessons other countries might take from the war to date. I also address the question of sustainability - is Russia running out of these precision munitions, and to what extent do their production facilities have the ability to compensate.

One thing I do want to say as well, is that while I try and take a reasonably detached look at issues like this, I want to make clear that discussing the performance of these systems shouldn't take away from recalling the very real human impact of their use, particularly against civilian targets or in built up areas.

Apologies for the late upload - wasn't well earlier this week and it pushed my recording window back.

.......................................................................
Editor's Note:
About Perun
Welcome all. This is a platform to support me if you appreciate the content, want more say in what I cover, or want to commission specific videos.

My YT was originally built on gaming content, and for those of you who are interested, that content has now been spun off into its own channel, now focused primarily on the upcoming title Terra Invicta.

Since February 24th however, I primarily cover international events (including the Ukraine war), trying to bring an defence industry and investment minded analysis to recent events. My recent videos have covered topics ranging from the performance of particular military systems in the Ukraine war, to economics and defence production. On these topics, expect long-form lecture style presentation on topics of interest.

The Patreon exists to give people a convenient way to support the content that I produce on a (roughly) weekly basis. There are no hard differences between the tiers other than the level of support provided, so please base your decision to support on your financial situation and the extent to which you enjoy my content. I am genuinely grateful to you all.

As always though, all of my content is available to all!

Thanks to everyone for your support.
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We All Need To Find Our 'Rat Park'

Submitted by: Brian Colgate/Barry Graham
2022-08-06

“Put a rat in a cage and give it 2 water bottles. One is just water and one is water laced with heroin or cocaine. “The rat will almost always prefer the drugged water and almost always kill itself in a couple of weeks. That is our theory of addiction. “Bruce comes along in the ’70s and said, ‘Well, hang on! We’re putting the rat in an empty cage. It has nothing to do. Let’s try this a bit differently.’ So he built Rat Park, and Rat Park is like heaven for rats. Everything a rat could want is in Rat Park. Lovely food. Lots of sex. Other rats to befriend. Coloured balls. Plus both water bottles, one with water and one with drugged water.

“Now here’s what's fascinating: In Rat Park, they don’t drink the drugged water. They hardly use it. None of them overdose. None of them use in a way that looks like compulsion or addiction. What Bruce did shows that both the right-wing and left-wing theories of addiction are wrong. The right-wing theory is that it’s a moral failing, you’re a hedonist, you party too hard. The left-wing theory is that it takes you over, your brain is hijacked.

“Bruce says it’s not your morality, it’s not your brain; it’s your cage.

“Addiction is largely an adaptation to your environment.

“Now, we created a society where significant numbers of us can't bear to be present in our lives without being on something, drink, drugs, sex, shopping, even our phones...

“We’ve created a hyperconsumerist, hyperindividualist, isolated world that is, for many of us, more like the first cage than the bonded, connected cages we need.

“The opposite of addiction is not sobriety. The opposite of addiction is connection. And our whole society, the engine of it, is geared toward making us connect with things not people. We no longer focus on bonding with other people, we now bond with stuff. In fact, we are trained from a young age to focus our hopes, dreams, and ambitions on things to buy and consume. Drug addiction is a subset of that."

#TheAllAmericanAddict



White School Black Memories

By: CWO John G. Barnes, MMM,MSM,CD
The Royal Canadian Regiment
Submitted by:Brian Colgate/Barry Graham
2022-08-06

Chief Warrant Officer John G. Barnes recounts his military career, with a focus on his experiences in Afghanistan as a Company Sergeant Major of Charles Company in the 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment during Operation MEDUSA. The fight for the “White School,” where the Taliban were formed in the mid-1990s, was the fiercest combat the Canadian Army had seen since the Korean War.

Barne’s extremely frank memoir is a tale of courage, greed, loss and eventual redemption in the manner of someone telling you a story at the kitchen table. Above all else, this is a book about the truth.

Available in August, 2022.



Russia Says It’s Losing Because Ukraine Has Experimental Mutant Troops Created in Secret Biolabs

By: Allison Quinn-The Daily Beast

Tue, July 19, 2022 at 6:45 a.m.·2 min read

Submitted by: John Cook
2022-07-18

Nearly five months into its senseless war against Ukraine, Russia has concocted a wild new explanation for why the Kremlin’s plans for a quick takeover fell apart so spectacularly—because Ukrainian troops were turned into superhuman killing machines during “secret experiments” in American-run biolabs, of course.

Never mind the myriad reports of Russian troops refusing to fight by the thousands, sabotaging their own shoddy equipment and even deliberately wounding themselves to abandon the war, Russian lawmakers claim the real setback for Moscow was “drugged up” Ukrainian soldiers.

That claim was made Monday by two Russian lawmakers heading up a commission to investigate “biolaboratories” in Ukraine, Kommersant reported.

Konstantin Kosachev, the deputy speaker of Russia’s Federation Council, and Irina Yarovaya, deputy chair of the State Duma, touted what they described as bombshell findings from the “investigation.”

Testing of Ukrainian POWs’ blood, they claimed, uncovered “a range of diseases” that suggest they were secretly experimented on “for military purposes.”

“And we see: the cruelty and barbarity with which the military personnel of Ukraine behave, the crimes that they commit against the civilian population, those monstrous crimes that they commit against prisoners of war, confirm that this system for the control and creation of a cruel murder machine was implemented under the management of the United States,” Yarovaya was quoted telling reporters.



"There is only one overriding standard for military capability: lethality."

By: LTG Newbold
Published by: https://taskandpurpose.com/news/critical-military-theory/
2022-07-15


Lt. General Gregory Newbold, director of operations at the Pentagon's military joint staff, conducts an operational briefing 16 October 2001 at the Pentagon, in Washington DC. (JOYCE NALTCHAYAN/AFP via Getty Images).

Many Americans, particularly our most senior politicians and military leaders, seem to have developed a form of dementia when it comes to warfare. The result is confusion or denial about the essential ingredients of a competent military force, and the costs of major power conflict. The memory loss is largely irrespective of political bent because all too many are seduced by a Hollywood-infused sense of antiseptic warfare and push-button solutions, while forgotten are the one million casualties of the Battle of the Somme in World War I, or the almost two million in the Battle of Stalingrad in World War II.

This “warfare dementia” is a dangerous and potentially catastrophic malady, because the price for it could alter the success of the American experiment and most assuredly will be paid in blood. The condition is exacerbated and enabled when the most senior military leaders — those who ought to know better — defer to the idealistic judgments of those whose credentials are either nonexistent or formed entirely by ideology.

The purpose of this essay is to explain the fundamental tenets of a military that will either deter potential enemies or decisively win the nation’s wars, thereby preserving our way of life. What follows are the tenets of Critical Military Theory:

"1. The U.S. military has two main purposes — to deter our enemies from engaging us in warfare, and if that fails, to defeat them in combat. Deterrence is only possible if the opposing force believes it will be defeated. Respect is not good enough; fear and certainty are required.

2. To be true to its purpose, the U.S. military cannot be a mirror image of the society it serves. Values that are admirable in civilian society — sensitivity, individuality, compassion, and tolerance for the less capable — are often antithetical to the traits that deter a potential enemy and win the wars that must be fought: Conformity, discipline, unity.

3. There is only one overriding standard for military capability: lethality. Those officeholders who dilute this core truth with civil society’s often appropriate priorities (diversity, gender focus, etc.) undermine the military’s chances of success in combat. Reduced chances for success mean more casualties, which makes defeat more likely. Combat is the harshest meritocracy that exists, and nothing but ruthless adherence to this principle contributes to deterrence and combat effectiveness.

4. A military should not be designed to win but to overwhelm. In baseball, you win if your total score is one run better than your opponent’s. In war, narrow victories incur what we call “the butcher’s bill.”

5. Wars must be waged only with stone-cold pragmatism, not idealism, and fought only when critical national interests are at stake. Hopes for changing cultures to fit our model are both elitist and naive. The failures of our campaigns in Iraq and especially in Afghanistan confirm this.

6. A military force’s greatest strengths are cohesion and discipline. Individuality or group identity is corrosive and a centrifugal force. Indeed, the military wears uniforms because uniformity is essential.

7. Infantry and special operations forces are different. The mission of those who engage in direct ground combat is manifestly distinct, and their standards and requirements must be as well. Not necessarily better, but different. For direct ground combat units, only the highest levels of discipline, fitness, cohesion, esprit, and just plain grit are acceptable. Insist on making their conditions and standards conform to other military communities, and you weaken the temper of steel in these modern-day Spartans."
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(Editors note: Changes to the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions refers)





Lesson of The Month




Humour in Uniform



Poetry Corner



Submissions to Poetry Corner

We are eagerly seeking submissions of a military nature to our Poetry Corner.
I know many of you have little gems of military trivia hidden away.
Please share them with your fellow members.

Send submissions to:

The Editor, Poetry Corner



4RCR Recruiting



Wolseley Barracks, London



Stratford Armoury, Stratford
Join Our Team

Looking for full-time or part-time work? We are hiring and provide excellent career opportunities. Please do not hesitate to call or email our recruiter who will be pleased to answer any questions you may have and provide direction on how to apply to our Regiment.

Our Team Recruiter

Name: London Reserve Recruiting Garrison
Phone: 519-660-5275, Ext. 5300
Email: londonrec@forces.gc.ca

Or contact

Phone: 1-800-856-8488
Find a recruiting centre near you.

When We Train

September to June:

Thursday evenings
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
one weekend per month.
Full-time summer employment is available from May to August.

Trades In Our Unit

Infantry Soldier
Infantry Officer
Financial Services Administrator
Human Resources Administrator
Chaplain

Equipment

Weapons:

Browning 9-mm Pistol C6 7.62-mm Medium Machine Gun C7A2 5.56-mm Automatic Rifle C9A2 Light Machine Gun Carl Gustav 84mm Short Range Anti-armour Weapon (Medium) Grenade

Vehicles:

Medium Support Vehicle System (MSVS) Militarized Commercial Off-The-Shelf (MilCOTS) Light Support Vehicle Wheel (LSVW) See a list of Canadian Army weapons and vehicles.




Who We Are

4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment (4 RCR) is a Primary Reserve Infantry unit based in London and Stratford, ON. The RCR was founded on 21 December 1883 as Canada's first truly-professional regiment of infantry and has fought gallantly in every conflict Canada has been involved in. 4 RCR, specifically, has drawn its soldiers from the London, Woodstock and Stratford area for more than 150 years.

Today, 4 RCR is a proud and active unit that strives to set the example in all matters of leadership and soldiering. 4 RCR’s role is to rigourously train its soldiers and officers, as part of 31 Canadian Brigade Group, to be ready for operations both domestically and around the world. The unit, in the past, committed more than 20% of its strength to Canadian operations in Afghanistan and nowadays actively augments operations domestically and in Europe. The role of the infantry is to close-with and destroy the enemy: often under challenging conditions. While the job of an infantryman is a demanding one, it is also a highly rewarding, exciting and fun career and the battalion offers a highly supportive and close-knit family network to all its members.

Benefits of Joining

When you join our unit, you will receive competitive pay for your part time or full time work as well as be eligible for on the job training that could benefit you in civilian life. Also, there are medical, dental and educational benefits available to Army Reservists.

Here are all the details:

  • Serve part time in the CAF
  • Competitive pay
  • On the job training
  • Medical and dental benefits
  • Paid education
Command Team

  • Commanding Officer: Lieutenant-Colonel Peter Reintjes, CD
  • Regimental Sergeant Major: Chief Warrant Officer Jeff Burke, CD
Contact Us

London

4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
Wolseley Barracks
701 Oxford St East
London, ON N5Y 4T7

Telephone: 519-660-5275, Ext. 5259

Stratford

4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
Stratford Armoury
80 Waterloo Street
Stratford, ON N5A 4A9

4RCR Contacts

London

4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
Wolseley Barracks
701 Oxford St East
London, ON N5Y 4T7

Telephone: 519-660-5275, Ext. 5259
Email: @forces.gc.ca

Stratford

4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
Stratford Armoury
80 Waterloo Street
Stratford, ON N5A 4A9

Contact 4RCR Council

BGen (ret'd) O'Brien, GJP, Chairperson,
519-902-0315,
obriengary1@outlook.com

Capt (Ret'd) Mombourquette, JV, Secretary,
519-439-9848,
fj3@rogers.com


Contact Webmaster



Regimental Contacts

The RCR Regimental Site
The RCR Association        
The RCR Regimental Warehouse
The RCR Museum

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